Good to know when location scouting

Rickard Molin
2018-06-25

Armed with your list of locations, you now can determine if the locations need a studio space or can be shot in location.


If, for instance, your interior is a space capsule, you may want to invest in a studio space where you can build an interior and leave it intact for the duration of your shoot. If the setting is a kitchen, you have to determine what kind of kitchen it is. Is it modern? Run down? In an apartment? These details are important to be mindful of when you are conducting your search. If you have a minimal budget, don’t despair. You can often rely upon the help of a clever set decorator to change your own kitchen into something much more sophisticated, or maybe underwhelming.

There are many resources available to help you find the best locations as well. Many film commissions have an online library of locations, broken down by category, on their website. They have staff that can help you find proper locations as well. Hiring a location manager is also a great step. They will scout sights, finding buildings and grounds that have the details required for the scene.
They are also skilled at acquiring permits and handling the contracts and other paperwork necessary to use certain locations. Shooting in California but need a street that resembles Boston’s Beacon Hill? They’ll help you find it! Shooting in New Mexico but need a plantation that rivals those built in Georgia during the 1800s? They’ll rise to that challenge!

 

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